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Programme: Sessions

Detailed Programme

Programme: Sessions and speakers still need to be confirmed for the JESIUM 2022.

Please click on a session to learn more. For all sessions: We don't go only for traditional elements!

1. Methodological AdvancesConveners:• Harro Meijer (University of Groningen, Netherlands)• Pascal Boeckx (co-convener; Ghent University, Belgium)Abstract:The possibilities for stable isotope analysis are continuously expanding. This session is meant to present new developments in instrumentation, analysis techniques, work on reference materials and novel analysis schemes and software. Contributions from both mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy are welcome. As in this session the focus should be clearly on the measurement methodology, examples from applications are welcome, but only to illustrate the new methodology, not to present the results of the applications as such.Senior keynote:• Thomas Röckmann (University of Utrecht, The Netherlands) – tentative title:  Possibilities, experiences and applications: the Thermo 253 ultraJunior keynote:• Lukas Flierl (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, Germany): Absolute Isotope RatiosAbstract:Mass spectrometry is in many cases the method of choice for isotope analysis. Therefore, there is a vast variation of different inlet systems, ion sources, analyzers, and detection systems. These can be almost arbitrarily combined, depending on the purpose and research focus. No matter which combination is used, all mass spectrometers have one issue in common: Absolute isotope ratios – traceable to the SI unit mole – are not directly available. This is due to many effects: Ions with different masses exhibit different efficiencies of detection or ion transmission. All these effects are commonly summarized by the term “mass bias” or “instrumental isotopic fractionation” and cannot be avoided.  Since mass bias is an intrinsic feature of mass spectrometry, certified isotope reference materials are used. With the knowledge of the isotopic composition of the reference material, the measured isotope ratios of the unknown samples can be corrected for mass bias, provided both have been measured under the same conditions. Additionally, reference and sample have to be as similar as possible with respect to their chemical and physical properties. Since the knowledge of the isotopic composition of the reference material is crucial and on the other hand absolute isotope ratios are not directly available by mass spectrometry, an urgent question arises: “How do we obtain the absolute isotope ratios of reference materials in the first place?”  In this talk, the primary method of gravimetric isotope mixtures is presented as the solution to the above dilemma. This method allows the determination of absolute isotope ratios without any prior knowledge. The talk will comprehensively explain the theoretical background and potential pitfalls. Real-life examples will be given. Additionally, it will be shown how this approach, which has been developed for atomic systems, can be modified to cover also molecular systems like carbon dioxide.2. Terrestrial and Aquatic BiogeochemistryConveners:• Christina Biasi (University of Eastern Finland, Finland)• Tobias Ruetting (co-convener; University of Gothernborg, Sweden)Senior keynote:• Wolfgang Wanek (University of Vienna): Nitrogen isotope fractionation to inform on controls of soil nitrogen cycle processesJunior keynote:• Isabell Klawonn (Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin (IGB))Abstract:Biogeochemistry deals with the biotic controls on the chemistry of the Earth System and concerns the cycling of elements. Those elements form the basis for life, representing macro- and micro-nutrients. Within the complex network of processes forming the biogeochemical cycles, stable isotopes offer powerful tools to study importance of pathways, turnover time and process rates. Stable isotopes tools to study biogeochemistry include both, the variation in natural abundance, natural isotope tracer as well as isotope enrichment studies. Furthermore, isotope modelling is increasingly applied for studying biogeochemical cycles.In this session, we welcome all contributions of stable isotope applications within biogeochemistry, also non-traditional elements and modelling approaches. We particularly welcome contributions investigating biogeochemistry across the terrestrial-aquatic boundary as well as exchange with the atmosphere.3. Plant EcophysiologyConveners:• Jaleh Ghashghaie (University of Paris-Saclay)• Thorsten Grams (co-convener; Technische Universität München)Senior keynote:• Lisa Wingate (French National Institute for Agricultural Research; France): Using a multi-functional enzyme-based approach to constrain the magnitude of the terrestrial biosphere CO2 sink.Abstract:Photosynthesis, the largest CO2 flux in to the land surface, is currently estimated with considerable uncertainty. More robust estimates of photosynthesis across the land surface could be obtained from the atmospheric budgets of other valuable tracers, such as carbonyl sulphide (COS) or the oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O or Δ17O) of atmospheric CO2. However, the partitioning of terrestrial photosynthesis and soil respiration at large scales using these tracers hinges on a better understanding of how activity of the enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) in plants and soil microbes varies and how to represent its spatial and temporal variability in land surface models. An overview of recent progress in the collection of multi-tracer datasets will be presented and how these can be used in multi-tracer land surface models to provide independent constraints on photosynthesis and respiration across scales.Junior keynote:• Philipp Giesemann (University of Bayreuth, Germany): Green plants are not as green as they seem to be. Are half of the plant kingdom potentially cheating on their fungal partners?Abstract:This session covers applications of stable isotopes in plant ecophysiology at different scales from the cell to the ecosystem level. Hence, contributions on metabolic and physiological functioning of plants, their interactions with the environment and biosphere-atmosphere exchanges are welcome.Natural abundances of stable isotopes in bulk organic matter, different metabolic fractions, individual metabolites and intramolecular distribution of isotopes for a given metabolite reveal different isotope fractionating steps of involved processes. Similarly, exchange with the inorganic environment, i.e. atmosphere, soil, water etc., will affect isotopic signatures. Understanding of these fractionation processes will allow for better understanding of the biological system functioning.Similarly, tracer experiments with isotopically labelled source material, e.g. 13C-enriched CO2, 2H2O or 15N-enriched nutrients, applied in short- term or continuously allow for studying resource fluxes and turn-over of pools. At a smaller scale, positionally labelled compounds for example in nutrient solutions help understanding compartmentation, process kinetics etc.This session seeks to highlight advances in process understanding at different scales. We are inviting presentations using experiments, laboratory and field measurements as well as modelling approaches.4. Paleoclimatology & ArchaeologyConveners:• Marcel van der Meer (NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and Utrecht University)• Maria Lahtinen-Kaislaniemi (Finnish Food Autority, Finland)Keynotes• Senior keynote: Prof. Kerstin Lidén (Stockholm University)• Junior keynote: Julie Lattaud (ETH Zurich): Changes in snow meltwater uptake by plants in the Mackenzie River Delta? Insight from compound-specific isotopes.Abstract:This session at JESIUM2020 is all about using stable isotopes to study how things were from archives such marine and lake sediments, tree-rings, ice cores, bogs, as well as remains of humans and animals. We would like to invite you to share your latest results and case studies, methodological insights, new proxies and applications for reconstructing past climates, environments and life. In archaeology, studies focused on isotope provenancing/tracking of humans, animals, artefacts and materials have proliferated in recent years, and we particularly encourage contributions touching upon isotope provenance.  In general we would like to encourage contributions on novel methodological developments, re-examination of old paradigms, approaches combining multiple isotope analyses on the same compound(s) or records, and isotope analysis of more difficult to analyze5. Health and Medical SciencesConveners:• Douglas Morrison (University of Glasgow)• Dwight E. Matthews (University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA)Senior keynote:Prof. Daniel Tome (French National Institute for Agricultural Research, Research Unit for Nutritional Physiology and Eating Behaviour)Abstract:A common problem in medical research is following the metabolism of molecules into products, whether it is the metabolism of drugs or the metabolism of endogenous metabolites, such as glucose.  In the latter case, the tracers can be used to measure both synthetic and degradative rates of a wide range of metabolites.  Radioactive isotopes have been incorporated into molecules and used as tracers, but the use of stable isotopically labeled (SIL) molecules as tracers and measurement by mass spectrometry (MS) has many advantages.  SIL tracers and MS has become the gold standard method.  All SIL tracers have to be measured against a natural abundance background of stable isotopes.  Thus, the use of SIL tracers has bifurcated between two methods: use of highly labeled SIL tracers that can be measured by gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) MS or use of SIL tracers of naturally low-level enriched tracers that require specialized isotope ratio (IR) MS methods.  Both provide a wealth of information about metabolic pathways, and talks and posters are solicited for work in this area highlighting use of SIL tracers in medical research.6. Food Authenticity, Nutrition, ForensicConveners:• Federica Camin (Fondazione Edmund Mach, Department of Food Quality and Nutrition (DQAN), Italy)• Annikki Welling, (co-convener; Finnish Food Authority, Finland)Senior keynote:Simon Kelly (IAEA, Vienna, Austria): Food safety and traceabilityAbstract:Food authentication is a rapidly growing field due to increasing public awareness concerning food quality and safety. Adulteration of food is deliberate and intentional substitution, addition, tampering or misrepresentation of food, food ingredients or food packaging or false or misleading statements made about a product for economic gain. Analysis of stable isotopic ratios in food authentication are especially useful in studies of misrepresentation of food, geographical origin, or production system (such as organic or conventional farming) because stable isotope ratios change with the source (natural or synthetic, botanical origin) climatic conditions, geographical origin, soil pedology, and geology of the locations of food ingredients origin. These studies are usually not straightforward analysis of SIR but requires stable isotope reference databases and multivariate modelling. We invite presentations of studies using stable isotope techniques in food adulteration, food authenticity, database collections and modelling approaches and building pipelines of food authenticity studies.7. Atmospheric Sciences (Pollution, Climate Change, Cosmogeochemistry)Conveners:• Joachim Mohn  / Jing Wei (Empa, Switzerland)• Caroline Buchen-Tschiskale (Thünen Institute, Germany)Abstract:Stable isotope techniques provide a robust, yet under-utilized tool to trace atmospheric source, loss and conversion processes. In air pollution research, isotope fingerprints of anthropogenic or natural contaminants are very useful to track environmental change across space and time. Owing mainly to anthropogenic activities including land use change, industrial activities and fossil fuel burning, the concentration of e.g. CO2, CH4, N2O and NH3 in the atmosphere increased leading to climate and ecosystem change. Isotope ratio analysis provides an independent approach for distinguishing between source categories to constrain emission budgets and transformation processes. Isotopic composition of the planets and the small bodies of the solar system display rich variations that reflect physical and chemical processes involving isotopic mixing among different reservoirs as well as fractionations arising in chemical reactions.This session includes advances in analytical measurement techniques providing isotopic composition of molecules as well as position-specific and multiply substituted isotopic substitution of compounds. Contributions from field and laboratory experiments as well as theoretical and modelling studies are welcome.Senior keynote:• Jan Kaiser (University of East Anglia, UK)Junior keynote:• Wendell W. Walters (Brown University, US): Evaluating the Atmospheric Dynamics of Nitrate and Sulfate in New England in Response to Emission Regulations Utilizing Novel Isotope ObservationsAbstract:Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen is a major terrestrial stressor, which has important implications for land and water quality and important interacting effects with climate. However, there are key uncertainties in linking precursor reductions to atmospheric deposition changes due to complicated production mechanisms of atmospheric nitrate driven by non-linear chemical feedback associated with oxidant availability, cloud water chemistry, heterogeneous chemistry, and gas/particle partitioning. This has led to disagreements between model predictions of atmospheric nitrogen deposition and observations, indicating that a thorough understanding of the processes associated with atmospheric deposition is needed to improve the existing Clean Air Act Secondary Standards. The stable oxygen and nitrogen isotope composition are powerful tools that can further our understanding of the atmospheric dynamics of atmospheric nitrate. The oxygen isotope composition (Δ17O) has been shown to provide quantitative observational constraints on atmospheric nitrate and sulfate production mechanisms. At the same time, nitrogen (δ15N) can aid in our understanding of connecting emission source contributions to atmospheric deposition.Here I will present recent results of a unique combination of concentration and isotope observations from several CASTNET locations located within New England from 2016-2018 to investigate spatial patterns in atmospheric nitrate (nitric acid (HNO3) + particulate nitrate (pNO3-)) dynamics. These new observational constraints will enable a process-level understanding of the connection between emission regulations and oxidation chemistry with important implications for predicting air quality and climate responses. Our results indicate significant spatial differences in HNO3 and pNO3- production within New England that tend to be consistently dominated by fuel-combustion emissions of NOx across this region. These novel observational constraints on oxidation chemistry and emission source spatiotemporal changes will be compared with atmospheric chemistry simulations to evaluate model representations of nitrate chemistry and precursor source contributions in New England in response to emission regulations.8. Soil Carbon and Nitrogen CyclingConveners:• Kristiina Karhu (University of Helsinki, Finland)• Marja Maljanen (co-convener; UEF, Finland)Abstract:Maintaining and increasing soil organic matter stocks is important for climate change mitigation and soil fertility, and thus also for future food security. This session invites contributions on C and N cycling in soils, with a focus on agricultural soils, and on the possibilities for increasing soil C stocks through changes in agricultural management, while also mitigating N2O emissions. We especially welcome isotopic and biomarker studies that aim to understanding the mechanisms, and the contribution of plant-microbe interactions and microbial community composition to C accumulation, for example through stabilisation of microbial necromass in soil or through management changes affecting the microbial carbon use efficiency. We also welcome studies that focus on the management of GHG emissions and nutrient losses from agricultural soils.Senior keynote:• Christopher Poeplau, Julia Schröder (Institute of Climate-Smart Agriculture, Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute): Five years of experience with the 18O Carbon Use Efficiency for understanding microbial physiology as a key driver of soil carbon cyclingAbstract:Research in recent decades revealed that soil organic carbon (SOC), and mineral associated organic carbon (MAOC) in particular, contains high proportions of microbial necromass. This led to the notion, that a high microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE), which is defined as microbial growth over uptake, should be beneficial for SOC build up. This is a change in paradigm and needs scientific evidence, which is difficult to obtain. For a long time, measuring microbial growth, which is needed to estimate CUE, was only possible by adding substrates. However, this is incomparable to the expected CUE during decomposition of actual soil organic matter, precluding to draw any meaningful conclusions on the actual drivers of CUE in the soil. The 18O-CUE method, first published in 2016, adds only water and follows the incorporation of heavy oxygen into microbial DNA. It is thus substrate-independent. We established the method in our laboratory five years ago and in this talk I will introduce the method, summarize the so far conducted case studies on a wide range of soils and research questions, share lessons learned and highlight open questions. For the first time, I will also use our so far obtained data from the Canadian subarctic to tropical Africa, for deriving expectable ranges in CUE and associated parameters such as microbial biomass, DNA content, basal respiration, microbial growth and turnover and how abiotic and biotic soil properties may relate to those.Junior keynote:• HemRaj Bhattarai (Natural Resources Institute Finland): Stable isotope approaches to identify HONO production mechanisms from soils 9. Isoscape, Spatial Variability of Stable Isotopes (Migration, Food Webs)Convenors:• Loïc Michel (Deep Environment Laboratory, Ifremer Brest, France)• Mikko Kiljunen (University of Jyväskylä; Finland)Abstract:Stable isotopes have been used as biological tracers for several decades, as they enable us to track changes and processes over time and/or space.  This has led to many breakthroughs in ecological research. Yet, the field of stable isotope ecology is as fruitful as ever, and researchers keep applying novel analytical methods (e.g. compound-specific isotope analysis), data analysis procedures (e.g. isoscapes, mixing models, niche metrics, trophic position estimations) and tracers (e.g. stable isotopes ratios of "non-traditional" elements, i.e. other than C, H, N, O and S).The aim of this session is to provide a forum for all ecologists who use stable isotopes for their research, regardless of their career stage, newcomers or experienced users alike. The session will be as inclusive as possible, with no limitations regarding the studied environments (terrestrial, freshwater or marine), the tackled questions (spatial ecology, animal migrations, food webs, ecological interactions, or other) or the considered organisation level (from individuals to whole ecosystems).We will welcome contributions aiming to develop novel methods, concepts or research directions; research questioning the assumptions underlying applications in stable isotope ecology; integrative approaches coupling stable isotopes with other ecological tracers; or simply case studies highlighting how established stable isotopes methods can provide answers to fundamental ecological questions. Senior keynote:• Clive Trueman (Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre, UK): Exploiting biogeochemical and physiological isotope systematics to address ecological questionsAbstract:Light stable isotopes have wide applicability as tracers because the elements we exploit are fundamental building blocks of essential nutrients and metabolites for all life on earth, as well as being involved in hydrological cycles.  Fractionation of isotopes through these physical, biochemical and biogeochemical processes creates the isotopic signals we use to infer process  - but the same complexity clouds our interpretation of stable isotope compositions.Stable isotope ecology is therefore a compromise between understanding the fundamental biogeochemical and physiological mechanisms underpinning fractionation and isotopic discrimination at multiple scales, and simplifying that complexity to a manageable level. In this talk I will illustrate the trade-off between understanding and application using three common applications of isotopes in ecology:  Animal migration, diet tracing and reconstructing metabolic rates. I will try to highlight areas of promising emerging work, including the use of simulation modelling and prediction to test how well our conceptual understanding of isotopic process explains the isotopic variability observed in nature. Junior keynote:• Doreen Kohlbach (Norwegian Polar Institute): Using stable isotope approaches to distinguish carbon sources in marine food websAbstract:Stable isotope approaches can be used to study predator-prey relationships of marine organisms and trace the carbon (energy) flow within marine food webs. To determine the trophic position of a consumer, nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ15N: 15N/14N), assessed via bulk stable isotope analysis (BSIA), can serve as an indicator of heterotrophic (re)cycling. In Arctic and Antarctic food webs, carbon sources can be distinguished and quantified based on the carbon isotopic composition (δ13C: 13C/12C) of primary producers (i.e. ice algae and phytoplankton) and consumers via BSIA or compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of specific fatty acids (FAs). Marine algae biosynthesize certain FAs that are transferred along the food chain without significant changes (trophic marker FAs), i.e. they can be traced in the consumers across multiple trophic levels. The isotopic signatures of these trophic marker FAs often differ between ice algae and phytoplankton. This isotopic separation allows for the discrimination of the consumer’s carbon sources, i.e. ice algae-derived or phytoplankton-derived, since this difference in δ13C is also transferred from the algae to the consumers. Applications, advantages and possible drawbacks of isotopic approaches for the exploration of food-web structures and interactions in polar environments as well as the combination with other biochemical tools (multi-trophic marker approach) are discussed.10. Geochemistry and HydrologyConvenors:• Dirk Sachse (GFZ Potsdam, Germany)• Ansgar Kahmen (University of Basel, Switzerland)Abstract:The Earth’s geochemical cycles provide the ingredients for life on our planet. The resulting biogeochemical cycles are subject to constant change on timescales of seconds to millions of years forced by changes in weather and climate as well as continental collisions. Although biogeochemical cycles have maintained a relatively stable window for life, changes imparted by natural forces as well as the anthropogenic interference with the Earth system have and will significantly alter biogeochemical cycles, such as the water and carbon cycles. Stable isotopes are a unique tool to characterize biogeochemical cycles over different temporal and spatial scales, to identify biogeochemical transitions from one system state to another, determine forcing factors of change and quantify fluxes, and ultimately predict their behaviour under changed boundary conditions, such as the Anthropocene.In this session we invite contributions that focus on the characterization of biogeochemical processes and their changes over different temporal and spatial scales, developed novel isotopic tools to track these processes, with a special focus on the water and carbon cycles. We invite contributions that for example investigate metabolic changes in living organisms from microbes to plants, identify processes that determine the origin and fate of water in ecosystems, estimate fluxes of CO2 into and out of natural carbon pools (such as soils, permafrost, sedimentary organic matter), determine the importance of earth surface processes (such as sediment transport) on the carbon cycle as well as studies that aim to track past changes in the water and carbon cycles and identify their forcing factors. We also welcome studies developing models that use or predict isotopic ratio changes during biogeochemical processes. We particularly envision inter- and transdisciplinary approaches that bridge timescales to explore feedbacks between long-term geological and short-term biological processes.Senior keynote:• Matthias Sprenger (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA)Junior keynote:S. Nemiah Ladd (University of Basel, Switzerland): Resolving hydroclimate signals from ecological shifts using H isotopes of concurrent lipid biomarkersAbstract:Phytoplankton play an important role in biogeochemical cycling, and can impact nutrient cycling as well as atmospheric and aquatic chemistry. However, reconstructing changes in algal productivity and community assembly throughout the geologic past remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate the utility of compound-specific hydrogen isotope compositions (δ2H values) of common algal lipids as a sensitive proxy of past algal ecology. While such measurements have been previously used as indicators of water hydrogen isotope ratios, our results from laboratory cultures and experimental ponds demonstrate that changes in the hydrogen isotopes of ubiquitous lipids such as palmitic acid associated with taxonomic changes are an order of magnitude greater than those caused by hydrologic change. These results indicate that δ2H values of algal lipids, and the relative offset of these values among different compounds, can be used to reconstruct past changes in algal community assemblages, including those driven by changes in nutrient supply.We applied this approach to a ~180 year sedimentary record from Lake Greifen, a lake in the central Swiss Plateau that underwent well-documented eutrophication and partial recovery in the second half of the 20th century. As total phosphorus concentrations in the lake increased from < 100 μg/L to ~500 μg/L in the 1950s-1970s, palmitic acid δ2H values increased by 40 ‰ and phytol δ2H values by 20 ‰; δ2H values of both compounds subsequently declined with total P following maximum values in the early 1980s. During this entire time interval, mean annual precipitation δ2H values fluctuated within a ~10 ‰ range and are not correlated with the changes in lipid δ2H values. Additionally, the decline in lipid δ2H values is correlated with declining relative abundance of green algae as the eutrophication pressure on Lake Greifen receded in the past decades. This correlation matches the prediction from our culturing and mesocosm results, in which green algae produced exceptionally 2H-enriched fatty acids compared to other algal taxa. This indicates that lipid δ2H values can be applied to reconstruct historically undocumented shifts in algal populations over timescales that are accessible through sedimentary archives.11. Molecular & Intra-Molecular BiologyConvenors:• Marja Tiirola (University of Jyväskulä; Finland)• David Berry (University of Vienna, Division of Microbial Ecology)Abstract:Recent technological advances and new stable isotope labelling approaches have greatly expanded our ability to study cell biology, biochemical pathways, and environmental questions. New instruments with increased sensitivity have opened up exciting possibilities to go from bulk measurements to highly sensitive compound-specific analyses. A variety of stable isotope labelled substrates are commercially-available, partly due to their need in the NMR spectroscopy. Compound-specific analysis of fatty acids, amino acids, proteins, and metabolites form a holistic approach to study microbial substrate utilization, and labelled DNA, RNA and proteins can be physically separated using stable isotope probing approaches. Furthermore, Nano-SIMS enables spatial analysis of the label e.g. in microbial biofilms, and heavy water labelling and Raman microspectroscopy can also be used for single-cell analysis of actively growing microbes. In cell biology, isotope labelling enables identification of peptides, proteins, and their components in DNA-protein and protein-protein complexes as well as studying e.g. post-translational modifications in proteins. This session will include the latest advances in stable isotope approaches used for detailed molecular analyses and increased mechanistic understanding.Senior keynote:• Nico Jehmlich (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig): Tracing incorporation the metabolic activity in microbiomes using protein-based stable isotope probing (protein-SIP)Abstract:The identification of metabolically active key players is one of the major cornerstones in microbial ecology. OMICs approaches in general allow us to gain a deeper insight into the structure and function of microbial communities. Among the OMICs tools, metaproteomics has become a central element in microbial ecology studies, as it is able to detect the functionalities carried out by the components of microbial communities. For detecting the metabolic activity of distinct community members, stable isotope probing techniques are necessary. Here, metabolic incorporation of heavy stable isotopes (usually 13C or 15N) into proteins has become a powerful procedure, since the assessment of incorporation enables the investigation of not only the general metabolic activity, but also the protein turnover rates. In this talk, I will explain the protein-SIP approach. The method can be utilized in a broad range of applications, and can use in principle all atoms of which stable isotopes are present in peptides (13C, 15N, 34/36S, D, 18O). Such applications include uncovering the most abundant consumers of substrates which can be conducted in simple to complex model systems, or even in in situ environmental field studies. In a time course experiment, the accurate quantification of incorporation in protein-SIP also enables the identification of food webs in microbial consortia.Junior keynote:• Fatima Pereira (University of Vienna, Division of Microbial Ecology): Raman-stable isotope probing (SIP) approaches to study microbiome function at the single-cell levelAbstract:Humans and other animals host diverse communities of microorganisms that play fundamental roles in their physiology and health. In order to understand how microorganisms interact with and shape the environments that they inhabit, analysing the phenotype of cells in their native habitat is essential. Stable isotope probing (SIP) enables tracking of isotopically-labelled atoms into microbial biomarkers and/or cells. SIP  can therefore be used to examine the specific uptake of isotopically-labelled nutrients into biomarkers, and/or the general activity of specific microbes in response to nutrients or pertubations. In this work, we developed and applied new SIP techniques that exploit non-destructive Raman microspectroscopy to enable the detection of stable isotopes in single cells of bacteria, and that can be coupled with methods to specifically identify the labelled bacteria, i.e., to link identity to function and activity. In one study, we combined heavy water, as a general tracer for metabolic activity, with a Raman-activated cell sorting approach and mini-metagenomics to identify key mucosal sugar utilizers from the mouse gut. Using this functional information, we assembled a five-member consortium of sialic acid and N-acetylglucosamine utilizers that impedes C. difficile’s access to these mucosal sugars and reduces pathogen colonization. More recently, we developed a novel high-throughput approach to combine stimulated-Raman scattering (SRS) with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), which is 100-100 times faster than previous approaches, thereby enabling high-throughput single-cell SIP for the first time. We exploited SRS-FISH to identify individual responses of the human gut microbiome to mucosal sugars and human-targeted drugs, therefore demonstrating unique individual responses of human microbiomes at the single-cell level. Overall, we show that novel Raman-SIP approaches are powerful for directly demonstrating microbial functions within complex communities.

 

Detailed Programme

Below the conference programme for this year's JESIUM. Note that smaller changes might still occur, we will keep everything up to date here on the website. Therefore we highly recommend regularly checking out the programme especially before booking travel and making other plans.

Download the programme

Sunday 09.10.2022

18:00 h ― ICEBREAKER, KUOPIO CITY HALL

Day 1, Monday 10.10.2022

08:00–08:30

Opening

Session 1: Methodological Advances (chairs: Harro Meijer & Pascal Boeckx)

08:30–09:00

Senior keynote: Thomas Röckmann: Possibilities, experiences and applications: the Thermo 253 ultra

9:00–9:15

Christian Ostertag-Henning: Raman spectroscopy as a tool to quantify the (relative) abundances of isotopologues of CO₂, experiences and applications: the Thermo 253 ultra

9:15–9:30

Chris Rennick: Calibration of a preconcentrator and laser spectrometer for δ¹³C(CH₄) and δD (CH₄) measurement in ambient air

09:30–9:45

Anita Aerts-Bijma: Where do IRMS’s go wrong? δ¹⁸O SLAP determined at -56.3 ‰

9:45–10:15 BREAK

10:15–10:45

Junior keynote: Lukas Flierl: Absolute Isotope Ratios

10:45–11:00

Caroline Gauchotte-Lindsay: RGC-based concentration, pyrolysis and trapping prep-system for position specific stable isotope analysis

11:00–11:15

Francois Fourel: δ²H measurements with various EA-IRMS techniques: a review. New application to archaeological mineralised tissues

11:15–11:30

David Dettman: Tunable infra-red laser differential absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS) measurement of multiple clumped isotope ratios in carbonates: progress and new horizons

11:30–11:45

Xuefei Li: Belowground Methane Turnover at a Boreal Peatland: Quantifying the Processes with in-situ Stable Isotope Methods

Session 2: Terrestrial & Aquatic Biogeochemistry (chairs: Christina Biasi & Tobias Rütting)

11:45–12:15

Senior keynote: Wolfgang Wanek: Nitrogen isotope fractionation to inform on controls of soil nitrogen cycle processes

12:15–12:30

Wenzel Gruber: Tracing N2O formation in full-scale wastewater treatment with natural abundance isotopes

12:30–12:45

Kirstin Dähnke: Nitrogen isotopes reveal a particulate-matter driven biogeochemical reactor in a temperate estuary

12:45–14:00 Lunch

14:00–14:15

Michaela Dippold: Belowground C allocation of tropical rainforests in response to drought: an ecosystem ¹³CO₂ labeling experiment

14:15–14:45

Junior keynote: Isabell Klawonn: Tracing carbon and nitrogen cycling pathways within microbial plankton communities: from single-cell to mesoscale processes

14:45–15:00

Tuula Larmola: Mosses as biofilters for ditch methane emissions from forestry drained peatlands

15:00–15:15

Travis Meador: Stable Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Dissolved Organic Matter in Inland Waters

15:15–15:30

Xiao Liu: Characterizing the transformation of hexachlorocyclohexane in soil-plant systems from lab to field scale using multi-element compound specific isotope analysis

15:30–15:45

Dominika Lewicka-Szczebak: Combining isotope mixing and fractionation with a new modelling tool applying the Monte Carlo approach

15:45–16:00 Short Break

Session 5: Health & Medical Sciences (chair: Douglas Morrison)

16:00–16:30

Keynote: to be announced

16:30–16:45

Ricardo Fernandes: Tracking nutrient metabolic pathways and detecting protein malnutrition using isotopic tracers

16:45–17:00

Thomas Piper: Development of mass spectrometry-based methods for the detection of 11-ketotestosterone, a novel doping agent

17:00–17:15

Harro A.J. Meijer: First Use of Triply Labelled Water analysis for energy expenditure measurements in mice

17:15–17:30

Noreen Tuross: Changes in the Nitrogen Isotope Composition of Serum Amino Acids in a Longterm Feeding Trial

17:30–19:00 Poster session 1

Day 2, Tuesday 11.10.2022

Session 11: Molecular & Intramolecular Biology (chairs: Marja Tiirola & David Berry)

08:30–09:00

Senior keynote: Nico Jehmlich: Tracing incorporation the metabolic activity in microbiomes using protein-based stable isotope probing (protein-SIP)

9:00–9:15

Anca Amariei: Position-Specific Isotope Analysis in Hopanoid Lipids

9:15–9:30

Henri Siljanen: Methanotrophy by putative monooxygenase in boreal spruce phyllosphere

9:30–10:00

Junior keynote: Fatima Pereira: “Raman-stable isotope probing (SIP) approaches to study microbiome function at the single-cell level”

Session 4: Paleoclimatology & Archeology (chairs: Marcel van der Meer & Maria Lahtinen-Kaislaniemi)

10:00–10:30

Senior keynote: Kerstin Lidén: How strontium isotopes have been to used and abused in archaeology

10:30–10:45

Carlo Cocozza: Bayesian uncertainty estimates for Atomic C:N Ratios in Archaeological Collagen

10:45–11:15 Break

11:15–11:30

Samuel Bodé: Unravelling dietary aspects of Late Mesolithic to Early/Middle Neolithic cultures in the Scheldt river valley, Belgium, by compound-specific 13C analysis

11:30–11:45

Markus Fjellström: Historic reindeer mobility in northern Sweden – a study of diet, mobility, and climatic changes by multiple stable isotope analysis

11:45–12:15

Junior keynote: Julie Lattaud: Changes in snow meltwater uptake by plants in the Mackenzie River Delta? Insight from compound-specific isotopes.

12:15–12:30

Raminta Skipityte: Stable isotopes tell the dietary history of the last two millennia Lithuanian inhabitants

12:30–12:45

Sean Hixon: Environmental and Anthropogenic Effects on Plant Amino Acid Nitrogen Isotope Values

12:45–14:00 Lunch

14:00–14:15

Kerstin Treydte: European summer vapor pressure deficit of the last 400 years reconstructed from a tree-ring oxygen isotope network

14:15–14:30

Abdur Rahman: Reconstruction of the environment and biogeochemistry of high altitude Himalayan Lake, existed during 33-7 ka, using stable isotopes systematics

14:30–14:45

Clément Massé: Long- and short-term dietary shifts in a generalist predator, the wolverine (Gulo gulo) over a century of change.

Session 6: Food Authenticity, Nutrition, Forensic (chairs: Federica Camin & Annikki Welling)

14:45–15:15

Keynote: Simon Kelly: Food safety and traceability

15:15–15:30

Micha Horacek: Species identification of ivory by stable isotope investigations

15:30–15:45

Silvia Pianezze: Characterisation of beef coming from different European countries through stable isotope (H, C, N, S and Sr) ratio analysis

15:45–16:00

Dana Alina Magdas: Optimized data processing tools for enhancing the performances of honey recognition models starting from the isotopic and elemental fingerprint

15:15–15:30

Kurt Krammer: Stable isotope investigations to control of declared geographic origin of Austrian and Slovak apricots, and apricots from other countries

15:30–15:45 Short Break

Sponsor session

15:45–16:00

Meike Fischer, Thermo Fisher Scientific: Workflow advancements in high precision δ¹⁸O analysis of water by means of low-T CO₂-H₂O equilibration

16:00–16:15

Calum Preece, Elementar UK Ltd: Analysis of dissolved nitrate stable isotopes using the one-step Ti (III) reduction method and iso FLOW GHG headspace analyzer

16:15–16:30

David Dettman, University of Arizona & David Nelson, Aerodyne Research, Inc.: Tunable infra-red laser differential absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS) measurement of multiple clumped isotope ratios in carbonates: progress and new horizons

16:30–16:45

Magdalena E. G. Hofmann, Picarro B.V. Improved throughput for δ18O and δD measurements of water with Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

16:45–17:00

Joanne Shorter, Aerodyne Research, Inc.; Integration of Laser Spectrometers with Diffusive In Situ Probes for Real Time Monitoring of Isotopes and Isotopologues of Soil Gases

17:00–17:15

Nina Albrecht, Thermo Fisher Scientific: The analysis of clumped isotopes in various gas species and fresh insights into petroleum and atmospheric research

18:45 CONFERENCE DINNER

Day 3, Wednesday 12.10.2022

Session 7: Atmospheric Sciences (chairs: Joachim Mohn & Caroline Buchen-Tschiskale)

8:30–9:00

Senior keynote: Jan Kaiser: Polyisotopocules for atmospheric chemistry

9:00–9:15

Sara M Defratyka: Verification of method used to determine δ¹³CH₄ during mobile vehicle-based methane measurements

9:15–9:30

Tim Arnold: Measuring and modelling four isotopologue ratios of methane in the atmosphere

9:30-9:45

Alice Drinkwater: Global and Regional Trends in CH4 and δ13C from 2004 to 2020

9:45–10:15

Junior keynote: Wendell W. Walters: Evaluating the Atmospheric Dynamics of Nitrate in New England in Response to Emission Regulations: Utilizing Novel Isotope Observations

BREAK 10:15–10:45

10:45–11:00

Sarah Albertin: Diurnal variations in N and O isotopes of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide and nitrate

11:00–11:15

Agne Masalaite: Isotopic ratios of aerosols for air pollution observation and its assessment as source indicators

11:15–11:30

Axel Horst: Stable chlorine isotopic composition of CH3Cl and CFC-12 in tropospheric air samples

11:30–11:45

Sanjeev Dasari: A potential proxy for tracing ozone layer depletion events–sulfur isotope anomalies(Δ33S) in polar ice cores

12:00–13:30 Lunch

AFTERNOON: SIDE EVENTS

Day 4, Thursday 13.10.2022

Session 3: Plant Ecophysiology (chairs: Jaleh Ghashghaie & Thorsten Grams)

8:30–9:00

Senior keynote: Lisa Wingate: Using stable isotopes to probe the carbon and water cycle

9:00–9:15

Christiane Werner: Tracing carbon, water and VOC fluxes through soil-plant-atmosphere by ecosystem 13CO2 and 2H2O Pulse-Labelling during drought and recovery

9:15–9:30

Ansgar Kahmen: Accounting for the metabolic component in the hydrogen isotopic composition of plant carbohydrates

9:30–9:45

Katja Rinne-Garmston: Interpretation of intra-annual tree-ring δ13C profiles of control, droughted and re-watered Scots pines

9:45–10:00

Yang XIA: Impact of varying NH4+:NO3– on C-isotope composition of leaf- and root-respired CO2 and putative respiratory substrates in Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

BREAK: 10:00–10:30

10:00–10:30

Junior keynote: Philipp Giesemann: Green plants are not as green as they seem to be. Are half of the plant kingdom potentially cheating on their fungal partners?

10:30–10:45

John Marshall: Monitoring passage of a point-based label of ²HHO through the soils and stems of a boreal pine forest

10:45–11:00

Olli-Pekka Tikkasalo: Interpreting tree ring carbon and oxygen isotopes as a response to selection harvest in a drained peatland forest

11:00–11:15

Kyohsuke Hikino: Carbon transport and allocation of mature Norway spruce during recovery from five years of repeated summer drought

11:15–11:30

Jeffrey Welker: Geometrid moth outbreaks alter understory plant nutrient and carbon dynamics in northern Finland’s mountain birch forest.

Session 9: Isoscape, Spatial Variability of Stable Isotopes (Migration, Food Webs) (chairs: Loïc Michel & Mikko Kiljunen)

11:30–12:00

Senior keynote: Clive Trueman: Exploiting biogeochemical and physiological isotope systematics to address ecological questions

12:00–12:15

Esther Cepeda Gamella: Towards fouling fauna fingerprinting: what is their contribution to the marine organic matter pool of an offshore wind farms?

12:15–12:30

Clément Massé: Long- and short-term dietary shifts in a generalist predator, the wolverine (Gulo gulo) over a century of change

12:30–12:45

Tamara Ann Hiltunen: Stable isotopes provide a window into the diets of Eurasian reindeer at different temporal and spatial scales

12:45–14:00 Lunch

14:00–14:30

Junior keynote: Doreen Kohlbach: Using stable isotope approaches to distinguish carbon sources in marine food webs

14:30–14:45

Amanda Ziegler: Seasonal and spatial variability of pelagic-benthic coupling strength in the Northern Barents Sea: A benthic food web approach

14:45–15:00

Philip Riekenberg: Reconstructing the diet, trophic level and migration pattern of mysticete whales based on baleen isotopic composition

15:00–15:15

Andrea Walters: Body size and depth drive trophic functioning: a case study of the English Channel-Celtic Sea continuum

15:15–15:30

Antti Eloranta: The variable food webs in cold-water lakes

15:30–15:45 Short Break

Session 10: Geochemistry and Hydrology (chairs: Dirk Sachse & Ansgar Kahmen)

15:45–16:15

Senior keynote: Matthias Sprenger: title to be announced

16:15–16:30

Daniel Nelson: Using machine learning to generate historic European monthly precipitation isotope time series from the 20th century to present day

16:30–16:45

tba

16:45–17:00

Theis Winter: New insights into the paleoclimate and recharge history of the Upper Jurassic aquifer using noble gas infiltration temperatures and 14CDOC.

17:00–17:15

Bibhasvata Dasgupta: Atmosphere-Cryosphere coupling processes–a closer look into High Mountain Hydrology

17:15–19:00 Poster session 2

Day 5, Friday 14.10.2022

Session 10: Geochemistry and Hydrology (chairs: Dirk Sachse & Ansgar Kahmen)

8:30–9:00

Junior keynote: S. Nemiah Ladd: Resolving hydroclimate signals from ecological shifts using H isotopes of concurrent lipid biomarkers

9:00–9:15

Evan James Wilcox: Exploring the influence of lake and watershed properties on lake water balances with water isotopes in the Canadian Arctic

9:15–9:30

Christin Müller: High frequency isotope monitoring for assessing hydrological extremes in the mesoscale Bode river catchment, Germany

9:30–9:45

Haiyan Yu: Multi-element Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Analysis (2H, 13C, 33/34S) to characterize the mechanism of sulfate and hydroxyl radical reactions with benzothiazole

9:45–10:00

Paul Koeniger: Stable isotope studies (d2H, d18O) of soil water movement in spruce and beech ecosystems at Solling, Germany

Session 8: Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling (chairs: Kristiina Karhu & Marja Maljanen)

10:00–10:30

Senior keynote: Christopher Poeplau: Five years of experience with the 18O Carbon Use Efficiency for understanding microbial physiology as a key driver of soil carbon cycling

BREAK: 10:30–11:00

11:00–11:15

Pauline Sophie Rummel: Increased C and N turnover after litter addition alters contribution of nitrification and denitrification to NO and N2O formation

11:15–11:30

Rob Roscioli: Real-time mapping of subsurface nitrous oxide isotopes and other trace gases from diffusive gas probes under a cattle grazing pasture

11:30–12:00

Junior keynote: HemRaj Bhattarai: Stable isotope approaches to identify HONO production mechanisms from soils

12:00–12:15

Caroline Buchen-Tschiskale: Tracing nitrogen transformations induced by ¹⁵N labelled cattle slurry applied with different techniques in winter wheat

12:15–12:30

Shasha Zhang: Continental-scale effects on the natural 15N abundance of plants and soils and isotope fractionation

12:30–12:45

Mengru Jia: How deadwood changes gross nitrogen turnover in two European forests: Insights from an 8-year common garden experiment

12:45–13:00

Marie Spohn: Nitrogen but not phosphorus addition affects symbiotic N₂ fixation by legumes in natural and semi-natural grasslands located on four continents

13:00–13:15

Angela Martin-Vivanco: Direct effects of temperature on the balance between priming and entombing effects under controlled conditions

13:15–14:30 Lunch

14:30–15:30:
Wrap up of JESIUM 2022

END OF JESIUM2022

 

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